Obesity and mortality: Early origins, selection, and trajectories

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Dr. Hui Zheng, Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology
Rank at the time of award: Assistant Professor

Abstract

This project intends to investigate the effects of obesity on mortality from life course perspective: the effect of early life conditions on adult obesity status and how this may vary by gender and over the life course, the effect of selection biases on the estimates of age variation in the obesity-mortality link, and the heterogeneity and mortality risk of obesity trajectories. This project will contribute to the cutting-edge research in obesity: (1) whether obesity is rooted in early life conditions or shaped by concurrent adulthood conditions; (2) whether the effect of obesity on mortality may increase or decrease over the life course; and (3) to what extent obesity may pose a threat to future gains in life expectancy.

Publications resulting from this seed grant:

Zheng, Hui, and Jonathan Dirlam. 2016. “The BMI-Mortality Link across the Life Course: Two Selection Biases and Their Effects.” Plos One.  PMCID:PMC4739746
 
Zheng, Hui, and Dmitry Tumin. 2015. “Variation in the Effects of Family Background and Birth Region on Adult Obesity: Results of a Prospective Cohort Study of a Great Depression-Era American cohort.” BMC-Public Health 15: 535. doi:10.1186/s12889-015-1870-7. PMCID: PMC4474348
 
Zheng, Hui, Dmitry Tumin, and Zhenchao Qian. 2013. “Obesity and Mortality Risk: New Findings from BMI Trajectories.” American Journal of Epidemiology 178(11):1591-9. PMCID: PMC3842899